Studio Open House

November 29 - December 1, 2013


For over 20 years, Brad Smith and Royce Yoder have brought together a variety of artists and craftspeople for a fun filled weekend of art and craft. Held each year over Thanksgiving weekend, the Studio Open House has become a tradition among families and friends alike. This year we have invited Jonathan Simons and Michael Reimer to join us at the open house.

Location
The Bradford Woodworking Studio, 3120 Fisher Road, Lansdale, PA 19446 (GPS friendly address)
Directions

Hours
Fri: 10 am to 5 pm
Sat: 10 am to 5 pm
Sun: 12 pm to 5 pm

Admission
FREE


Brad Smith

Brad Smith has been making furniture on his farm in Southeastern Pennsylvania for more than thirty years. He developed a keen interest in furniture in high school, continued learning the craft while working for a local cabinet maker before going to R.I.T. to study furniture design.


Royce Yoder

Royce became interested in making pots while attending Hesston College in Kansas. He finished his formal education in 1976 at Goshen College in Indiana. Royce's goal after graduating was to establish his own pottery studio. In 1983 that goal became a reality when Royce built his own studio outside Lederach, Pennsylvania. In 1988 he built a house on the same property and he currently resides there with his wife.

Since that first year, Royce has made over a hundred thousand hand-thrown pottery pieces. His work can be found in galleries and shops all over the United States. He also exhibits at two or three craft shows each year. Royce’s goal is to make work that functions both practically and visually. All of the pieces are microwave and dishwasher safe as well as lead free.

For more information about Royce's work, visit his site www.royceyoderpotter.com.


Michael Reimer

So I'm at work on a Saturday, waiting to do my part of a system upgrade, when I type 'Fish Print' into Google. I was looking to buy fish art for my office. I ran across a web site for Gyotaku and take an immediate interest in the subject. I spend the next few months researching everything I can about gyotaku, practicing in my mind how I'm going to make my own fish prints. I even bought a few through the internet.

It finally gets warm enough the following March to catch a few bluegill in a local pond. Armed with red acrylic paint, news print and my then 8 year old daughter as my assistant, we make some prints which look like fish shaped blobs of ink. Not discouraged, I practice and practice until I feel comfortable enough to use rice paper, rather than news print and block printing ink, rather than acrylic paint.

Fast forward several months to the point where I liked them enough to start framing them and hanging them in my office. Friends of my wife ask if they can buy some as gifts for their husbands and I think hmm......

The following fall, I signed up for my first art show. Since then, I've joined the Nature Printing Society http://www.natureprintingsociety.info/ , the Pennsylvania Guild of Craftsmen http://www.pennsylvaniacrafts.com/ and the Greater Norristown Art League http://www.gnal.org/.

In February of 2008, I became a juried member of the Pennsylvania Guild of Craftsmen. Juried status in the PGC is an honor awarded to work deemed to show excellence in craftsmanship, resolved design and unique voice or style. I am honored to be a juried member.

 All of my art work is hanging up in my office between shows. The only prints that I mat and/or frame are one's that I'd keep as my own if I never sold another. Since I catch the fish (or in some cases, was with a friend who caught a fish), I have a connection to each print. I do most of my fishing in Montgomery County, Chester County and Berks County PA.

I hope you enjoy looking at them as much as I enjoyed making them.

For more information about Michael's work, visit his site www.michaelreimer.com.


Jonathan Simons

It all started the day I forgot to put a spoon in my lunch bag when I was working as an apprentice to a furniture maker. I took a piece of scrap wood and quickly shaped a spoon. I had majored in art and design at the University of Illinois, and wanted to create something both beautiful and functional, which led me to explore working with wood.

In 1978, following my apprenticeship, I worked in a canoe-seat factory in Maine. When I was laid off from my job, I wanted to work for myself. My home workshop was in the garage, and at 20 degrees below zero, it was too cold for glue to set so I could only make single piece products.

That is when I remembered spoons.

After trading spoons for food, and barely surviving, I found a sales representative who helped launch my business with a whopping $6000 of sales in my first year. In 1979 I moved back to my home state, Pennsylvania, which has a milder climate and a good supply of native hardwood, began making spoons and selling them. At my first national craft show, I underpriced my spoons and sold out my years' production in the first hour of the show.

My spoons have developed over the years. Originally made of uncommon spoon woods such as lilac, plum, and honeysuckle, I have since chosen to make my spoons of cherry wood. This is a hardwood with handsome color and grain, durable, smooth, and strong. My utensils have a unique sense of balance and warmth because they are designed with the hand and purpose in mind. "Spoons" have become spatulas, tongs, spaghetti forks, spreaders, and more. Today I offer a natural cherry finish, a flame-blackened surface with a sanded edge to reveal an accent of warm cherry wood, as well as flame-blackened stripes and spots.

From the start-up days of producing spoons in a chilly workshop in Maine, Jonathan's Spoons has grown into a successful craft business. I have a shop in rural Kempton, Pennsylvania where two brothers; Shawn and Neil Claypoole have joined me in creating my many designs.

I exhibit my work at select craft shows around the country, to include the annual state show of the Pennsylvania Designer Craftsmen, American Craft Council shows, Paradise City shows, the Philadelphia Buyer's Market, and the New York International Gift Show. A busy show schedule requires a lot of traveling; fortunately I am often accompanied by my lovely wife, Julia. Together, we find it rewarding to share in the offering of quality American made arts and crafts.

Most of my time is spent creating new products in my Kempton, Pennsylvania shop, traveling to craft shows with Julia, and fathering four beautiful daughters and one son.

For more information about Jonathan's work, visit his site www.woodspoon.com.